The Scottish Wildlife Trust manage the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve and is reviewing how the reserve will be managed over the next 10 years. We would like people who have an interest in the reserve to share their views on the management of the site. Please let us know what you think should be included in the next 10 year management plan by completing the questionnaire below. The map included shows the boundary of the reserve so you know exactly which piece of land we are referring to.


Consultation deadline: Monday 1st March.
 
The Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve, part of The Clyde Valley Woodlands National Nature Reserve and the Clyde Valley Walkway, lies approximately 1 mile south of the town of Lanark and is reached through the historic village of New Lanark. The reserve is part of a spectacular landscape that includes the River Clyde tumbling through a rocky gorge, the famous waterfall Corra Linn, ancient woodland and planted woodland, the latter which includes many fine specimen trees. The reserve is a major visitor attraction and is provided with a visitor centre within the old dye works in New Lanark. Over 50,000 people visit the reserve annually and the reserve rangers run a very successful and comprehensive events and educational programme.

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Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve

Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve

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* 1. How often do you visit Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve?

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* 2. Since Covid restrictions have been in place, has your pattern of visiting changed? Tick all that apply.

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* 3. How far do you travel to access Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve?

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* 4. Typically, what method of transport do you use to access Falls of Clyde?

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* 5. Who do you usually go to the reserve with?

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* 6. Which of these best describes you? Pick the three most relevant.

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* 7. What do you like most about the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve?

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* 8. What do you dislike about the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve?

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* 9. What could be done to improve the reserve?

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* 10. Do you have any specific comments about the current level of interpretation at the reserve? Do we need more/less? How could we improve?

Long term management plan objectives

1. To restore and maintain a predominantly native broad-leaved woodland, including maintaining the Site of Special Scientific Interest, (SSSI) in Favourable Conservation Status. This allows all important elements, including important woodland species, to be sustained over time with minimal intervention.

2. To maintain or enhance other habitats or populations of other notable species where this does not conflict with objective 1.

3. To encourage recreational and educational access to the reserve, where this does not conflict with objective 1.

4. To manage the significant historical and archaeological features on the reserve.

5. To comply with all obligations and maintain high standards of reserve management.

The work planned over the next ten years includes;

• Thinning out dense stands of conifer trees to allow further natural regeneration of native broad-leaved woodland.

• Continuing to fell beech and sycamore where appropriate to create gaps in the tree canopy, which will allow native species such as ash, oak, birch and hazel to grow.

• Maintaining a good quantity of dead wood, both as standing dead trees and fallen logs for fungi and the insects.

• Dealing with ash die-back- many ash trees may die over the coming years, so we will be working to fill the gaps with native species.

• Controlling non-native invasive species such as rhododendron.

• Regular patrolling and maintenance of the footpaths.

• Continuing to run our range of guided walks and talks, for example badger watch, dipper watch, Halloween and Christmas events.

• Maintaining and interpreting the historical and cultural features of the site.

• Installation of anti-slip strips on the boardwalk.

• Improve facilities for tool and equipment storage.

• Improved Interpretation and signage. 

• Grazing the meadow to improve conditions for wildflowers.

• Recruitment of a seasonal ranger every year.

• Recruitment of volunteers to assist with events.

• Working with our current conservation volunteers to provide a meaningful experience at Falls of Clyde and other Clyde Valley reserves.

• Continue with biodiversity monitoring: birds, bumblebees, butterflies, and possibly a new addition; meadow plants.


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* 11. Do you have any comments about the draft management objectives and the potential activities needed to achieve these objectives?

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* 12. Do you have any other ideas or comments you wish to make about the reserve?

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* 13. Please select your age.

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* 14. Please provide your contact details if you are happy to be contacted by us in relation to your response to this consultation.

Thank you for your time. Your input is most appreciated.
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