Plagiarism survey: 2018

Plagiarism is a hot topic with much written about it, but there are few facts about editors’ actual experiences. This short survey has been created to learn what experience editors have of plagiarism in their journals an to discover if it is more prevalent in some regions or disciplines than in others. (More information about the survey can be found at the foot of this page.)
 
Please answer the following questions with information from the past year – we appreciate that you will (in some cases) be relying on memory rather than records, and that is why we are asking only about the past year.

If you have not had any experience of plagiarism this is important for us to know - please answer the first two questions and those who have not received plagiarised submissions will be directed to the end of the survey.
 
For editors with experience of plagiarised submissions, there are 15 questions, and the survey should take about 5-10 minutes.

What percentage of all submitted articles, to all journals, do you think are plagiarised articles?

Question Title

* 1. What percentage of all submitted articles, to all journals, do you think are plagiarised articles?

0 50 100
i We adjusted the number you entered based on the slider’s scale.
In the past year have you received any submissions that you identified as containing plagiarised content?
(Note that it is equally important for us to know if you have or have not had any experience of plagiarised submissions.)

Question Title

* 2. In the past year have you received any submissions that you identified as containing plagiarised content?
(Note that it is equally important for us to know if you have or have not had any experience of plagiarised submissions.)


WHY THIS SURVEY?
Although statistics from similarity checkers (e.g. iThenticate) can be used to report on duplication, they do not provide evidence of plagiarism. Equally, using retractions as evidence only identifies plagiarism that has not been discovered during review. It is hoped that this research will provide better insight into plagiarism at the time of submission. This initial survey hopes to obtain a better understanding of the level of plagiarism experienced by editors. Based on the findings, the research may be extended to obtain greater depth of information about plagiarism in journal submissions around the world.
 
The findings of this survey will be published (with peer review approval, of course). The results of the survey will be shared with participants who opt to provide their contact details (the survey is anonymous by default).

WHO IS BEHIND THIS SURVEY?
The survey is endorsed by the European Association of Scientific Editors (EASE) as a part of its research outreach.


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