Vote for your favourite out of The Atkinson's collection!

A History of Lancashire in 70 Objects is an 18 month project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.  It is a partnership between Lancashire Heritage Learning, Museum Development North West and Lancashire Life magazine.  The project aims to engage communities across the County Palatine (the old county regions: current Lancashire, Greater Manchester, Liverpool and Warrington and the Furness area of Cumbria) with objects and stories held in their local museums, galleries and heritage venues.  It also aims to engage with new audiences and promote visits across all participating venues.

In 2017, the magazine Lancashire Life will celebrate its 70th birthday.  To celebrate this, Lancashire Life will show 70 objects from heritage venues across Lancashire’s County Palatine between September and November that year and they will be included in the magazine.  A guide of all the participating venues will be produced and distributed by Lancashire Life to encourage visits to all participating venues and for children and families, an 'I-spy' type trail guide will also be created.

Pick your winner by stating the number in the end box.

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1. Watercolour of Duke’s Folly by W G Herdman: William Sutton is credited with founding Southport in 1792 when he took advantage of the fashionable new trend of sea bathing.  He built a bathing house at South Hawes and, realising the importance of the newly created canal systems, gambled with the idea of a hotel by the seaside just 4 miles away from the newly constructed Leeds and Liverpool Canal to and from which he arranged transport for potential guests.  He constructed his ‘Original Hotel’ at the southern end of what is now Lord Street.  The project became a source of disbelief and amusement to the folk of Churchtown and Meols, who referred to Sutton as ‘The Mad Duke’ and the hotel as ‘Duke’s Folly’.  Over time Lord Street grew, with the hotel anchoring the southern end, helping to create its own more respectable address.

<span style="color: #000000;"><strong>1. Watercolour of Duke’s Folly by W G Herdman</strong>:</span> <span style="color: #808080;">William Sutton is credited with founding Southport in 1792 when he took advantage of the fashionable new trend of sea bathing.  He built a bathing house at South Hawes and, realising the importance of the newly created canal systems, gambled with the idea of a hotel by the seaside just 4 miles away from the newly constructed Leeds and Liverpool Canal to and from which he arranged transport for potential guests.  He constructed his ‘Original Hotel’ at the southern end of what is now Lord Street.  The project became a source of disbelief and amusement to the folk of Churchtown and Meols, who referred to Sutton as ‘The Mad Duke’ and the hotel as ‘Duke’s Folly’.  Over time Lord Street grew, with the hotel anchoring the southern end, helping to create its own more respectable address.</span>

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2. Commemorative postcard of the crew of the ‘Eliza Fernley’: This postcard commemorates 11 of the 16 lifeboat crew of the Southport lifeboat, ‘Eliza Fernley’, most of whom lost their lives trying to rescue a German boat the ‘Mexico’ that had run into difficulty off the Southport coast in December 1886.  The events of that night are known as the ‘Mexico Disaster’ and it is the worst disaster in the history of the RNLI as 27 lifeboat men lost their lives that night.  For the Southport lifeboat crew, 14 of the 16 lifeboat men lost their lives while trying to rescue the crew of the Mexico.  Only two men survived and the disaster had a huge impact on the local community as many of the men were fishermen who supplemented their income by also being lifeboat men.

<span style="color: #000000;"><strong>2. Commemorative postcard of the crew of the ‘Eliza Fernley’</strong><span style="color: #808080;">: This postcard commemorates 11 of the 16 lifeboat crew of the Southport lifeboat, ‘Eliza Fernley’, most of whom lost their lives trying to rescue a German boat the ‘Mexico’ that had run into difficulty off the Southport coast in December 1886.  The events of that night are known as the ‘Mexico Disaster’ and it is the worst disaster in the history of the RNLI as 27 lifeboat men lost their lives that night.  For the Southport lifeboat crew, 14 of the 16 lifeboat men lost their lives while trying to rescue the crew of the Mexico.  Only two men survived and the disaster had a huge impact on the local community as many of the men were fishermen who supplemented their income by also being lifeboat men.</span></span>

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3. Shrimping cart: Southport has always had a history of fishing, including the catching of shrimps, which has been carried out in Southport and nearby districts for centuries. References for it can be found as far back as 1113 to fishing in the Parish of North Meols.  The fish caught included sole, plaice, crab, herring, cockles and of course shrimp.  By the 1800s there was a fleet of 13 trawl boats, mostly made locally and known as ’Nobby’s’.  Horse-drawn carts or mechanical vehicles trawl nets behind boats, known as ‘shanking’. Another method, though less frequently used today, consists of pushing a net along the sea bed to catch the shrimps; this is known as ‘putting’.  With the gradual filling of the channels on this part of the coast, boat ‘shanking’ had to cease and cart ‘shanking’ became the method employed.  Today you are more likely to see the fishing carried out by means of an amphibious vehicle.  As well as shrimping, this cart was also used to bring the bodies of drowned sailors and fishermen off Southport beach.  This was the last of the wooden wheeled shrimp carts and was used for the final time in 1966. 

<strong><span style="color: #000000;">3. Shrimping cart</span></strong><span style="color: #808080;">: Southport has always had a history of fishing, including the catching of shrimps, which has been carried out in Southport and nearby districts for centuries. References for it can be found as far back as 1113 to fishing in the Parish of North Meols.  The fish caught included sole, plaice, crab, herring, cockles and of course shrimp.  By the 1800s there was a fleet of 13 trawl boats, mostly made locally and known as ’Nobby’s’.  Horse-drawn carts or mechanical vehicles trawl nets behind boats, known as ‘shanking’. Another method, though less frequently used today, consists of pushing a net along the sea bed to catch the shrimps; this is known as ‘putting’.  With the gradual filling of the channels on this part of the coast, boat ‘shanking’ had to cease and cart ‘shanking’ became the method employed.  Today you are more likely to see the fishing carried out by means of an amphibious vehicle.  As well as shrimping, this cart was also used to bring the bodies of drowned sailors and fishermen off Southport beach.  This was the last of the wooden wheeled shrimp carts and was used for the final time in 1966.  </span>

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4. Dug-out canoe, AD 535: This canoe was found on 22nd April 1899 in a field near Crossens by a local farmer, Peter Brookfield, whilst he was ploughing his field.  Brookfield sent for the Reverend William Bulpit, a keen local historian to look at the canoe and he identified it as having an early age and being of interest.  This canoe is one of 11 that were found in the area from time to time but it is the only one to survive as the others were left to decay.  The field where it was found lay near the northern shore of the former lake known as Martin Mere.  Martine Mere was the largest lake in England before it was drained in the 1700s and 1800s.  There are several legends connecting Martin Mere with King Arthur and Lancelot of the Lake.  In 1996 a sample of the canoe was sent off for radiocarbon dating and it was dated to AD 535, which places it at the very end of the Roman period but at a time considered too early for the Anglo-Saxon settlement in the region.  Whoever was using the canoe was clearly exploiting the wetlands in and around Martin Mere.

<span style="color: #000000;"><strong>4. Dug-out canoe, AD 535</strong></span><span style="color: #808080;">: This canoe was found on 22nd April 1899 in a field near Crossens by a local farmer, Peter Brookfield, whilst he was ploughing his field.  Brookfield sent for the Reverend William Bulpit, a keen local historian to look at the canoe and he identified it as having an early age and being of interest.  This canoe is one of 11 that were found in the area from time to time but it is the only one to survive as the others were left to decay.  The field where it was found lay near the northern shore of the former lake known as Martin Mere.  Martine Mere was the largest lake in England before it was drained in the 1700s and 1800s.  There are several legends connecting Martin Mere with King Arthur and Lancelot of the Lake.  In 1996 a sample of the canoe was sent off for radiocarbon dating and it was dated to AD 535, which places it at the very end of the Roman period but at a time considered too early for the Anglo-Saxon settlement in the region.  Whoever was using the canoe was clearly exploiting the wetlands in and around Martin Mere.</span>

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5. Oil painting by Fortunino Matania ‘Southport for a Holiday in Wintertime’, c1935: Fortunino Matania was born in Naples, Italy in 1881. This painting was one of a series of views of Southport commissioned in the 1930s by Southport Corporation and the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. The painting was used for publicity posters and shows glamorous patrons leaving the Garrick Theatre, Lord Street after a night out and was intended to promote Southport as an upmarket resort.

<span style="color: #000000;"><strong>5. Oil painting by Fortunino Matania ‘Southport for a Holiday in Wintertime’, c1935</strong></span><span style="color: #808080;">: Fortunino Matania was born in Naples, Italy in 1881. This painting was one of a series of views of Southport commissioned in the 1930s by Southport Corporation and the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. The painting was used for publicity posters and shows glamorous patrons leaving the Garrick Theatre, Lord Street after a night out and was intended to promote Southport as an upmarket resort.</span>

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6. Luftwaffe map of Bootle: German bombing map of Bootle with the grain stores at Alexandra Dock circled in red.  Bootle, for its size, took the heaviest bombing of the country during World War 2.  Bootle and Liverpool had become a lifeline to Britain during the Battle of the Atlantic and the convoys were controlled from an underground command centre in Liverpool.  The food, fuel, weapons and troops that came in to Liverpool saved Britain and made possible the liberation of Europe.  Between May 1st and 8th 1941, over seven consecutive nights, German planes dropped 870 tonnes of high explosive bombs and over 112,000 incendiary bombs.  On its worst night, Saturday 3rd May 1941, nearly 50 bombs were dropped on the town.  Bootle was extensively damaged by the Luftwaffe and only 10% of properties in the town were left unscathed.  Sadly it was a prime target due to its close proximity to the docks. 

<span style="color: #000000;"><strong>6. Luftwaffe map of Bootle</strong></span><span style="color: #808080;">: German bombing map of Bootle with the grain stores at Alexandra Dock circled in red.  Bootle, for its size, took the heaviest bombing of the country during World War 2.  Bootle and Liverpool had become a lifeline to Britain during the Battle of the Atlantic and the convoys were controlled from an underground command centre in Liverpool.  The food, fuel, weapons and troops that came in to Liverpool saved Britain and made possible the liberation of Europe.  Between May 1st and 8th 1941, over seven consecutive nights, German planes dropped 870 tonnes of high explosive bombs and over 112,000 incendiary bombs.  On its worst night, Saturday 3rd May 1941, nearly 50 bombs were dropped on the town.  Bootle was extensively damaged by the Luftwaffe and only 10% of properties in the town were left unscathed.  Sadly it was a prime target due to its close proximity to the docks. </span>

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